Tour Itinerary Book Now

This tour will include 9 most popular Tourist Places of Bangalore which are must see tourist attractions in the City. Those Places are:

 

1. Iskcon Temple

2. Bull Temple

3. Dodda Ganesha Temple

4. Tipu Sultan's Palace

5. Lalbagh Botanical Garden Cauvery Emporium

6. Vishweshwaraiah Museum

7. Cubbon Park

8. Vidhana soudha (out side way)

9. High Court (out side way)

 

See the detailed pages for more information regarding these places and their importance.

Iskcon Temple Book Now

ISKCON Sri Radha Krishna Temple in Bengaluru is one of the most visited places in the city today. The temple has, over the years, been recognized as one of the renowned ISKCON centers in the world due to its architectural splendour and the efforts to bring about a spiritual uplift in the society through its various spiritual activities.

 

The magnificent temple complex, one of the largest ISKCON temples in the world stands on Hare Krishna Hill, a seven-acre hillock in Rajajinagar. It displays a beautiful blend of traditional temple architecture and the modern style of construction. The temple was dedicated to the service of humanity following its inauguration on May 31, 1997.

 

The spacious main temple hall has a beautiful gold plated altar, attractive interior designs and ceiling with huge paintings depicting the pastimes of Lord Krishna with His devotees. 

 

The Deities:


The presiding Deities of the temple are Sri Radha Krishnachandra, Sri Krishna Balarama and Sri Nitai Gauranga (Sri Nityananda Prabhu and Sri Chaitanya Mahaprabhu) situated in the main temple.

There are also two smaller shrines before the main temple for the worship of Sri Srinivasa Govinda and Sri Prahlada Narasimha. There are also Deities of Garudadeva and Hanuman on either side at the entrance of the Narasimha shrine. Everyday thousands of devotees from various parts of India and other countries visit the temple to seek the blessings of Their Lordships.

 

Special features of the temple:

  • Hari-nama mantapa which provides a unique opportunity to chant Hare Krishna maha-mantra 108 times before having darshan of Their Lordships.
  • An Annadana Hall where free delicious lunch prasadam is served to the devotees visiting the temple.
  • Distribution of the books of Srila Prabhupada, the Founder-acharya of ISKCON, which contain the essence of Vedic knowledge, highlighting the science of Bhakti-yoga
  • An interesting diorama in the lecture hall portraying the theme of soul changing bodies.
  • A Goshala with 25 cows, well maintained by a team of three trained dairymen.
  • A beautiful pond with colorful fountains for conducting teppotsava (boat-ride of Their Lordships) on the occasion of some festivals.
  • Dakshinakriti, an exhibition and sale of handicrafts in the Vedic tradition.
  • A video show of Little Krishna, a popular animated series produced by ISKCON Bangalore on the childhood pastimes of Krishna.
  • Prasadam Counters which sell delicious prasadam – sweets, savories, and baked items of south and north Indian varieties, juice, milk, etc.
  • Free prasadam also is served to all the visitors to the temple.
  • The Higher Taste Restaurant serves pure, sattvik food with extraordinary quality.
  • A guest house with modern amenities.
  • Dwarakapuri Hall and Mathura Hall where any religious/social ceremonies or corporate meetings or seminars can be conducted.

Bull Temple Book Now

The Bull Temple, also known as Nandi Temple, is one of the oldest temples in the city of Bengaluru. The temple is popularly called as 'Dodda Basavana Gudi' by the locals and is the biggest temple dedicated to Nandi in the world. Nandi, the bull, is the mount or 'vahana' of Lord Shiva and the guardian deity of Lord Shiva's abode, Kailashagiri; according to Hindu traditions. This temple is every Shiva devotee's must-visit destination because Nandi holds great importance to Lord Shiva.

The architectural style of the Bull Temple is mainly Dravidian and was constructed by Kempe Gowda. It is believed that the origin of the river Vrishabhavati is at the feet of Nandi. The entire sculpture of the bull is carved out of one single granite rock. The statue is 4.5 meters high and 6.5 meters long. Coconut oil, butter and 'benne' are regularly applied to this statue. This had led to the originally grey statue to turn black.

 

On the premises of the Bull Temple, there is also a beautiful temple of Ganesh, the beloved son of Lord Shiva. An interesting fact about this temple is that the statue of Lord Ganesh is made entirely of butter! It takes about 110 kilos of butter to make this artistic statue, and a new statue is made every four years. What is really astonishing and noteworthy is that in the four-year tenure of each butter sculpture, the butter doesn't melt or change shape even once. The butter that makes the statue of the deity is then distributed to the devotees as prasad.
 

Dodda Ganesha Temple Book Now

Dodda Basavana Gudi (the Nandhi Temple) is situated in Bull Temple Road, Basavanagudi, area of South Bangalore, part of the largest city of the Indian state of Karnataka. The Hindu temple is inside a park called Bugle Rock.

The bull referred to is a sacred Hindu demi-god, known as Nandi; Nandi is a close devotee and attendant of Shiva. Dodda Basavana Gudi is said to be the biggest temple to Nandi in the world. The stone monolith idol of Nandi is continually covered with new layers of butter, benne in the local language of Kannada. There is an idol of the elephant-headed Hindu deity Ganesha close by.

 

Every year on the last Monday and Tuesday of the Hindu month of Karthika Maasa a groundnut fair is held in the temple premises and groundnut is offered to the deity. This fair is known as 'Kadalekaayi Parishe' in local tongue. Groundnut sellers and devotees throng the place during Kadalekaayi Parishe.

Tipu Sultan's Palace Book Now

Tipu Sultan's Summer Palace, in Bangalore, India, is an example of Indo-Islamic architecture and was the summer residence of the Mysorean ruler Tipu Sultan. Hyder Ali commenced its construction within the walls of the Bangalore Fort, and it was completed during the reign of Tipu Sultan in 1791. After Tipu Sultan's death in the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War, the British Administration used the palace for its Secretariat before moving to Attara Kacheri in 1868. Today the government of Karnataka maintains the palace, which is located at the center of Old Bangalore near the Kalasipalyam bus stand, as a tourist spot.

 

The structure was built entirely teak and stands adorned with pillars, arches and balconies. It is believed that Tipu Sultan used to conduct his durbar (court) from the eastern and western balconies of the upper floor. There are four smaller rooms in the corners of first floor which were Zenana Quarters. There are beautiful floral motifs embellishing the walls of the palace. The site also holds a painting of grand throne visualized by Tipu Sultan himself. Coated with gold sheets and stuck with precious emerald stones, Tipu had vowed never to use it until he completely defeated the British Army. After Tipu Sultan's death, the British dismantled the throne and auctioned its parts as it was too expensive for a single person to buy whole.

 

The rooms in the ground floor have been converted into a small museum showcasing various achievements of Tipu Sultan and his administration. There are newly done portraits of the people and places of that time. There is a replica of Tipu's Tiger, which is in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Tipu Sultan's clothes and his crown are present in silver and gold pedestals. The silver vessels given by a general to Hyder Ali is also displayed.

Lalbagh Botanical Garden Book Now

Lalbagh or Lalbagh Botanical Gardens, meaning The Red Garden in English, is a well-known botanical garden in southern Bengaluru, India. It has a famous glass house dating from 1889 which hosts two annual flower shows (26 January and 15 August). Lalbagh houses India's largest collection of tropical plants, has a lake, and is one of the main tourist attractions in Bengaluru. Lal Bagh is also home to a few species of birds. The commonly sighted birds include Myna, Parakeets, Crows, Brahminy Kite, Pond Heron, Common Egret, Kingfisher, Spotted Owlets, Spotted kite, Spotted Pelican, Ducks, Indian Cormorant, Purple Moor Hen etc.

 

History:

 

Hyder Ali commissioned the building of this garden in 1760 but his son, Tipu Sultan, completed it. Hyder Ali decided to create this garden on the lines of the Mughal Gardens that were gaining popularity during his time. Hyder Ali laid out these famous botanical gardens and his son added horticultural wealth to them by importing trees and plants from several countries. Hyder Ali deployed people from Thigala community who were extremely good in gardening. The Lalbagh gardens were commissioned by the 18th century and over the years it acquired India's first lawn-clock and the subcontinent's largest collection of rare plants. A menagerie established in the 1860s was under the charge of G.H. Krumbiegel in 1914. Captain S.S.Flower reported that it included a Court built between 1850 and 1860 having tigers and rhinoceros; an aviary; a monkey house with an orangutan; a paddock with blackbuck, chital, Sambhur deer, barking deer and a pair of emus; a bear house and a peacock enclosure.

 

The Lalbagh gardens are based on the design of the Mughal Gardens that once stood at Sira, at a distance of 120 km from Bengaluru on the main NH4 at Tumkur District in Karnataka. This is amply supported by ASI (Archaeological Survey of India) and other historical records. At that time, Sira was the headquarters of the strategically important southernmost Mughal "suba" (province) of the Deccan before the British Raj.

 

In 1874, Lalbagh had an area of 45 acres (180,000 m2). In 1889, 30 acres were added to the eastern side, followed by 13 acres in 1891 including the rock with Kempegowda tower and 94 acres more in 1894 on the eastern side just below the rock bringing it to a total of 188 acres (760,000 m2).[6] The foundation stone for the Glass House, modeled on London's Crystal Palace was laid on 30 November 1889 by Prince Albert Victor and was built by John Cameron, the then superintendent of Lalbagh. It was built with cast iron from the Saracen Foundry in Glasgow UK.

Vishweshwaraya Museum Book Now

The Visvesvaraya Industrial and Technological Museum, (VITM), Bangalore, India, a constituent unit of the National Council of Science Museums (NCSM), Ministry of Culture, Government of India, was established in memory of Bharat Ratna Sir M Visvesvaraya. The building, with a built up area of 4,000 m2 (43,000 sq ft), was constructed in Cubbon Park. It houses various scientific experiments and engines, and was inaugurated by the first Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru, on 14 July 1962. The first gallery set up at VITM, on the theme of 'Electricity', was opened to the public on 27 July 1965.

In order to honour Bharat Ratna Sir M Visvesvaraya, the All India Manufacturers’ Organisation, Mysore State Board, decided to set up a science and technology museum at Bangalore, and the foundation stone was laid by Shri B. D. Jatti, Chief Minister of Mysore, on 15 September 1958. The Visvesvaraya Industrial Museum Society (VIMS) came to be registered as the nodal agency in order to pool resources from various industrial houses. A building with a display space of 4,000 m2 (43,000 sq ft), which was constructed in Cubbon Park, houses displays of industrial products and engines. It was inaugurated by the first Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru, on 14 July 1962.

 

History:

 

However, the society felt that the southern region lacked a science museum. The eastern region already had a science museum in Calcutta under CSIR, which was quite popular, and on the Society’s request CSIR took over VITM. The society nominated a permanent representative to the executive committee of VITM, and on 27 July 1965, VITM opened in Bangalore with the first gallery on the theme of ‘Electricity’.

 

In the year 1970, VITM launched the Mobile Science Exhibition (MSE) with 24 participatory exhibits mounted on a bus. The MSE Bus travels throughout South India, and it continues to be a very effective tool for Science communication in the rural area as the bus carries with it a portable planetarium, telescope for night sky observations, HD large screen TV for science film shows in the evenings, materials for conducting popular science shows and demonstrations aimed towards the general populace.

In 1978, the science museums/centres including VITM were delinked from CSIR and brought under a newly formed society registered on 4 April 1978 as National Council of Science Museums (NCSM). In 1979, an extension was added to the building, increasing the total area of the museum to 6,900 m2 (74,000 sq ft).

NCSM set up three additional science centers at Gulbarga (Karnataka) in 1984, Tirunelveli (Tamil Nadu) in 1987 and Tirupati (Andhra Pradesh) in 1993, which are functioning under the direct administrative control of VITM. Thus, VITM has become the southern zone headquarters of NCSM.

The museum attracts nearly one million visitors a year,[citation needed] and is open on all days (except Deepavali and Ganesha Chathurthi) from 09.30 to 18:00.

Cubbon Park Book Now

Cubbon Park, Officially called Sri Chamarajendra Park is a landmark 'lung' area of the Bengaluru city, located ( WikiMiniAtlas12.97°N 77.6°E) within the heart of the city in the Central Administrative Area. Originally created in 1870, when Major General Richard Sankey was the then British Chief Engineer of Mysore state, it covered an area of 100 acres (0.40 km2) and subsequent expansion has taken place and the area reported now is about 300 acres (1.2 km2). It has a rich recorded history of abundant flora and fauna plantations coupled with numerous impressive and aesthetically located buildings and statues of famous personages, in its precincts. This public park was first named as Meade’s Park after Sir John Meade, the acting Commissioner of Mysuru in 1870 and subsequently renamed as Cubbon Park after the longest-serving commissioner of the time, Sir Mark Cubbon. To commemorate the Silver Jubilee of Sri Krishnaraja Wodeyar’s rule in Mysore State, in 1927, the park was again renamed as Sri. Chamarajendra Park, in memory of the 19th-century ruler of the state Sri Chamarajendra Wodeyar (1868–94), during whose rule the park came into existence. 

The landscaping in the park creatively integrates natural rock outcrops with thickets of trees, massive bamboos, with grassy expanse and flowerbeds and the monuments within its limits, regulated by the Horticulture Department of the Government of Karnataka. The predominantly green area of the park has many motorable roads, and the well-laid-out walking paths running through the park are frequented by early morning walkers and the naturalists who study plants in the tranquil natural environment.

 

Tourists visiting this park in the city of Bengaluru have nicknamed the city itself as 'Garden City'.

 

The importance of the park to the city's environment is best stated by two urban architects who have won the national competition to design 'Freedom Park.'

Vidhana soudha Book Now

The Vidhana Soudha located in Bengaluru, is the seat of the state legislature of Karnataka. It is constructed in a style sometimes described as Mysore Neo-Dravidian, and incorporates elements of Indo-Saracenic and Dravidian styles. The construction was completed in 1956.

 

Origin:

 

Kengal Hanumanthaiah is credited with the conception and construction of the Vidhana Soudha. The foundation stone was laid by the then Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru and then chief minister K.C Reddy, on July 13, 1951. However, it was Hanumanthaiah who was instrumental in the redesign and speedy construction of Vidhana Soudha. He visited Europe, Russia, the United States, and other places and got the idea of building the Vidhana Soudha by incorporating various designs from the buildings he had seen. It was completed in 1956. He took a lot of interest and effort in building this marvelous granite building. It was meant to dwarf the British-built Athara Kacheri (High Court) building. Hanumanthaiah was criticized for the nearly 15 million rupees spent to construct the building. But the building designed by him is an outstanding structure of Neo Dravidian style. The land area is 60 acres.

 

Design and construction

Vidhana Soudha, Bangalore

The slogan "Government Work Is God's Work" is inscribed in Kannada and English above the entrance to the Vidhana Soudha.
The Vidhana Soudha has four floors above and one floor below ground level and sprawls across an area of 2,300 by 1,150 feet (700 m × 350 m). It is the largest Legislative building in India. Its eastern face has a porch with 12 granite columns, 40 feet (12 m) feet tall. Leading to the foyer is a flight of stairs with 45 steps, more than 200 feet (61 m) wide. The central dome, 60 feet (18 m) in diameter, is crowned by a likeness of the Indian national emblem.

The front of the building is inscribed with the slogan "Government's Work is God's Work," and the Kannada equivalent, "??????? ???? ???? ????" (sarkarada kelasa devara kelasa).[3] In 1957, the Mysore government planned to replace the inscription with Satyameva Jayate, at a cost of 7,500 rupees,[7] but the change did not take place. In 1996, the inscription inspired a visiting U.S. state governor, George Voinovich of Ohio, to propose etching "With God, all things are possible" onto the Ohio Statehouse, prompting a high-profile lawsuit.

The cost of construction at that time was just 17.5 million rupees. But presently, annual maintenance cost itself is more than 20 million rupees (which include repairs, painting, and other miscellaneous expenses).

The building is illuminated on Sundays and public holidays.

High Court Book Now

The Karnataka High Court is the High Court of the Indian state of Karnataka. It is located in Bangalore, the capital city of Karnataka. The High Court functions out of a red brick building known as Attara Kacheri. It is in front of Vidhana Soudha, which is the seat of the legislature of Karnataka.The Karnataka High Court is currently functional in Bangalore, Hubli-Dharwad and Gulbarga.

The history of the Karnataka High Court can be traced back to the year 1884, under the reign of the Maharaja of Mysore Chamarajendra Wadiyar, when the Chief Court of Mysore was reconstituted with three judges and was designated as the highest court of appeal in the princely State of Mysore.

Earlier The Court of the Chief Judge, Mysore, was set up in 1880 along with three other courts - the Court of District judges, the Bangalore Court of Small Causes and subordinate and Munsiff courts. The Bangalore Small Causes Court was abolished in 1881.

In 1930, it was renamed as the High Court of Mysore and the Chief Judge was given the new name of Chief Justice. In 1973, it got its present name of "Karnataka High Court".